Princess Alexandra Eye Pavilion

45 Chalmers Street, Edinburgh, Scotland, EH3 9HA

 

Recent Reviews

 
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Involvement
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Information
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Staff
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30th June 2017
Written by a patient

This was my second cataract op and went well. Nurses and surgeons excellent My one (and major) complaint was that I was in recovery and had to wait TWO hours for the pharmacy to deign to supply my drugs to take away. Talking to the nurses they seemed intimidated by the pharmacist and would not contact Angela(?) to expedite delivery. I think Angela needs a course in customer care and a reeducation as to why she is employed.

Recommend
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Dignity/Respect
1 2 3 4 5

Involvement
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Information
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Cleanliness
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Staff
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29th June 2017
Written by a patient

Nurse Bruce provided excellent care, understanding and surgical treatment. The entire treatment was timeless with repeated information about what to expect and guidance throughout the whole process. Whilst the building is dated and tired it's closure is pending and with that contemporary facilities await at the New Royal Infirmary. In addition to the exceptional care provided by Nurse Bruce all staff I encountered not only met reasonable expectations but exceeded them and with that I can reassure anyone referred to the unit they will be treated with the utmost dignity and respect as I was as a disabled permanent wheelchair user.

Recommend
1 2 3 4 5

Dignity/Respect
1 2 3 4 5

Involvement
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Information
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Cleanliness
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Staff
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16th March 2017
Written by a patient

Although I have no complaints about the actual eye care I have received here, this place has serious problems with its nursing and administrative staff. From the moment I arrived at the front desk, I encountered off-hand attitudes, and I witnessed some downright and kindness. I was very shocked during a recent day admission for a cataract operation to find that all patients were herded into one room, and sensitive questions (such as 'have you passed urine this morning?') were asked of elderly people of both genders in front of everyone else. Most of the nurses were well mannered, and one or two were lovely, but none of them explained to us what was going on, or when our operations would actually happen. That would be really simple to do, and would have prevented a lot of anxiety. In retrospect, I can work out what the system was. At the time it just seemed like ramshackle chaos. One nurse was absolutely awful. Interestingly, she was the only one not wearing a name tag, which makes me wonder whether she has been complained about before. She chewed gum throughout the day, and responded to any call for assistance by saying "Just a minute", but she never came. A patient with a walking frame who needed the loo was left to panic while that nurse chatted with a colleague, in front of us all, about how one of the surgeons was too fussy about when eye drops should be administered in advance of the operation - saying that the surgeon's instructions could be ignored because it was easier to do all the patients at once. That didn't exactly inspire confidence just before going under the knife. They didn't tell us the meaning of the various different coloured uniforms staff were wearing, but the unpleasant nurse's tunic was slightly darker than the rest, so I wonder whether she might actually have been in charge! Like many of the other patients, I was asked to sign a consent form when I could not see well enough to read, and the nurse who took my signature told me nothing about what was written on the form I was signing, or what the procedure would involve. I used to work in the health service, and we would not have considered that to be informed consent! I was too scared to complain, because I know I will need to go back to have my other eye done, and I don't want to be victimised, but there really is no reason why being in the eye pavilion should be so frightening, undignified and unpleasant. It's not a question of money, it's about management and training, and alerting staff to the fact that although it is just another working day for them, for their patients a visit to hospital is a nerve-wracking occasion. The patient doesn't know the routine or the geography of the hospital, and shouldn't be expected to. Simple friendly communication can inspire confidence, and prevent a visit to the Eye Pavilion turning into the nightmare of anxiety that I, and those around me, experienced.

Recommend
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Dignity/Respect
1 2 3 4 5

Involvement
1 2 3 4 5

Information
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Cleanliness
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Staff
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7th July 2015
Written by a carer

Be careful if you have any eye operations here as they gave my mum permenant double vision and told her you will have to hav prisms now to sea properly she was supposed to have routine operation for Graves' disease.

Recommend
1 2 3 4 5

Dignity/Respect
1 2 3 4 5

Involvement
1 2 3 4 5

Information
1 2 3 4 5

Cleanliness
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Staff
1 2 3 4 5
14th February 2015
Written by a patient

I felt when I was a patient at the Eye Pavilion,everything was perfect about my care,and I was treated in a kind and sympathetic manner by Dr Kerr and her team. I would recommend Dr Kerr to anyone with an eye condition,as I think she's an excellent and dedicated doctor.Keep up the good work,Dr Kerr,- you've built up your good reputation through years of hard work,- well done!


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